#metoo, Why NOT.

#metoo is a movement based on a flawed premise.

I could say #metoo, but I’d rather not think or speak about any of that, ever again because now, I know too much about creating my own reality.

This shit is not random.

Why would anyone want to pull themselves backwards in time to a terrible experience, to relive it, so they could get emotionally stuck in that place, AGAIN?!

Wasn’t suffering once, enough?

The more you talk about it, the more it becomes who you are.

Is that who you want to be?

How long do you want this to be part of your reality?

How’s it working out for you?

I choose to survive and thrive despite what happened to me, by putting it behind me. So can you.

I furthermore accept the belief, I created all of the behaviors and circumstances that attracted those bad situations to me. Wait. WTF?! How?

Blame the victim? You bet.

In a world that is saying you “didn’t deserve it”,

I’m telling you. You. Created. All of that.

By accepting the belief that I have the power to create my own reality, it prevents me from being victimized ever again, because I cleaned up my vibration, my beliefs and my behavior that caused it.

Do you really believe we live in a world where anyone can insert themselves into your reality? F@k no!

When we feel vulnerable as women, we attract people who want to take advantage of us.

When we play the victim, we get more of being victimized.

They don’t call it a “victim mentality” for no reason.

When we feel like we don’t have any power, it becomes a self fulfilling prophecy.

Check your stats Ladies and be brutally honest with yourself about what happened to you and if you don’t ever want it to happen again, do the energy work required to fix it.

We all have scars we can sit around and pick at or commiserate about, but I’d rather focus on where I’m going, than where I’ve been.

I’d rather empower other women or anyone for that matter, to believe that it doesn’t matter what you’ve been through, you can rise above any circumstance and thrive.

Don’t look back. It’s not where you’re going.

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20 Skills You Should Know Before Applying For A Sewing Job!

When applying for a sewing job, alteration or repair work, I highly recommend you know the following key skills and especially those that could be related to the projects:

1. How to open a regular and serged seam with a seam ripper, without damaging the fabric. Practice on thrift store garments and only cut the sewing threads and not the fabric.

2. Zipper skills! Replace a zipper, install a zipper, know the difference between a Single Lap, Double Lap, Exposed and Invisible zipper.

Know how to sew a zipper into a stretch Fabric.

Any thrift store garment will do for practicing this skill.

3. Sewing snaps. You’d be surprised how many people don’t do this correctly. On costumes, you should use a four thread thickness and stitches that go around the outside of the snap. Neatness, puckering, lose threads not evenly pulled and what it looks like on the other side does matter! You should know how to sew a snap that goes through and through all the multiple layers of fabric and one that stays on a single layer of fabric and doesn’t show through the front.

When I see a stitch that goes from hole to hole it’s a problem. It interferes with a good firm snap connection and isn’t as long lasting or secure. You’d be surprised how many people sew the female side on upside down, if you’re not sure which side faces out, snap it to check. You should also always put the flat or male side of the snap against the body.

4. Hand and machine sewing a button. 2 hole, 4 hole and (by hand) shank.

5. Cut Fabric on the bias

6. Cut out a pattern on the fold and one with a grain line. How to cut velvet, fur and nap fabrics with a one direction design.

7. Sew a regular darts and a French dart.

8. Install a sleeve properly (baste curve) especially when they are not a mirrored sleeve pattern.

9. Hand stitch and machine stitch a hem

10. Know how to install elastic into a hem and sewn in elastic.

11. Sewing Pleats

12. Gathering Properly

13. Threading an industrial sewing machine and serger

14. Changing threads and bobbins

15. Changing needles

16. How to do a French seam and felled seam.

17. Making a rolled hem with and without a hem foot

18. Sewing stretch fabrics and woven fabrics

19. Making Button Holes with and without a button hole setting

20. Pressing seams and darts with an industrial iron

If you are proficient at all of the above skills you should be a confident contender where a sewing test is being given.

Gina Vincenza Van Epps

Costume Fabrication Specialist at

Universal Theme Parks

Celebrity Seamstress

Influencer

Founder,

Orlando Fashion District

aka Psycho Seamstress

Fashion Designers Pre Production Survey

Do you have Fashion Designs you’d like to have made into patterns and prototypes to test your designs?

As the Founder of Orlando Fashion District its my mission to help you!

This is Step 1 on the pre production path to getting Your Fashion Designs into production and becoming a bonafide Fashion Designer!

Most of my clients ARE NOT educated or experienced in Fashion. Most have day jobs they want to eventually quit and are transitioning into fashion as their exit strategy.

You do not need a degree or experience in Fashion to become a successful designer. When you surround yourself with people who can guide you through the process by connecting you with the experts, you can get there from here.

I can work with you one of two ways. I can teach you as much as you’d like to learn or know to manage the daily details yourself OR you can hire me to manage it for you while you design and make all the big decisions.

Take this survey about how far along you are with your designs and get a free consultation from me on what next steps you can take to move forward.

https://form.jotform.com/81332938508158

10 Ways To Pre Sell Your Fashion Collection

As the Founder of Orlando Fashion District, my mission is to help Fashion Designers succeed in business.

Here’s some of my best advice on how to leverage the money you spend on patterns and prototypes to fund the production of your designs vs spending thousands of dollars on a production run that hasn’t been tested on the market yet and hoping it will sell.

  1. Wear them! I highly recommend making yourself the fit model for your Designs whenever possible. Why? Because when I wear what I’ve designed (last night for example) I handed out 20+ business cards at a rock concert to people who said they loved the Steampunk Themed Top Hat, Jacket and Boots I made. I had 2 different people offer me $150 to buy my hat right off my head! Stand out in a crowd. Make yourself a walking billboard and engage your admirers by stopping right then and there and have them follow you on your social media accounts. Boom. Wearing your designs will also let you test the reaction, fit, fabrics, laundering aftermath and so on. It’s a necessary part of the research and development of your brand.
  2. Do a professional looking photo shoot of your designs. Hire models if needed, have a nice background, good lighting and get some great shots of your designs from all angles. These photos can be used for multiple things, which I will outline further below.
  3. Post photos to your social media. This is huge and if you don’t already have a website, Instagram or Facebook page for your designs you better get on it! Use your social media to showcase, debut, take pre orders for your designs and get feedback from your followers. If you need help building an Instagram account, I highly recommend KelpSocial.com they took our Orlando Fashion District account from 200 to 3,600 and growing, organically in a matter of weeks. Tell them you were referred by Orlando Fashion District and get a free month plus 10% off after your trial. You can set your Instagram account up to share your posts to Facebook, saving a lot of posting time.
  4. Launch a crowdfunding campaign. One of the best gurus in the industry on how to do this is Shannon Lohr at Factory45.co Presell your designs and fund your first production run with advanced orders using Your prototypes and photos. You’ll need to have your fabrics sourced and production numbers together with everything ready to rock and roll when the pre orders come in.
  5. Do a Runway Show. This will get you some great professional runway photos of models wearing your designs, good feedback from the crowd and potentially some buyers. I know Designers who sell their fashion right off the runway and take orders for their designs.
  6. Show your Designs at Convention, Tradeshow or Expo events. Some of the biggest events are the Surf Expo for swimwear designers, (surfexpo.com) Magic Las Vegas is one of the Fashion industries biggest sourcing events. http://www.ubmfashion.com/shows/magic I know designers who walked in with prototypes and walked out with Production contracts in hand.
  7. Negotiate retail contracts. I know a woman with an extensive list of top department stores and retailers who she can negotiate retail contracts with of your designs. Contact me directly for this inside information at Gina@PsychoSeamstress.com
  8. Start small on Etsy. Use your photos. Find a local seamstress who can make your designs as needed and sell them with up to a 6 week turnaround time. Get paid in advance and then ship it out made to order.
  9. Ask for Boutique orders. Pack your designs into a garment bag or suitcase and take them around to local boutiques with swatches of any other available fabrics. Show them your collection and ask for orders with a 50% deposit of at least 2X your cost and get the balance on delivery. They should be able to resell your designs for at least 2X what they paid you. (Keystone Pricing) If you can charge more then definitely do!
  10. Use Influencers. Ideally you should give your design to them for free, have them take photos wearing it and write you an unlicensed review you can use, post or share to your social media. Ideally an influencer should have at least 10k followers, be willing to blog their review, post photos to their social media and tag you. If you’d like me to review your design email me at Gina@PsychoSeamstress.com to see if we’re a good match.

For more help, resources and information on how to launch your own fashion brand, many of my clients have hired me as a consultant.

I can help you get through your patterns and prototypes, get graded and digitized, source fabrics, get your social media and branding image together, launch an influencer campaign, find a production house, show your collection on a fashion week or celebrity attempted runway show anywhere in the world and more.

Fashionably Yours,

Gina Vincenza Van Epps

Fashion Influencer

aka Psycho Seamstress

Founder of

Orlando Fashion District

Fashion Destination

#ofd

http://www.Psychoseamstress.com

http://www.OrlandoFashionDistrict.com

Follow me on Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn and Quora

7 Ways to Make Money Sewing

1. Sew for hire. I’ve been doing this since 2008 by placing an ad on Craigslist under Creative Services. People who need things made but don’t know how to sew, will hire you. Use photos from completed projects for your next ad and make social media profiles and posts to further market your work.

2. Apply for sewing jobs. I work at Universal Theme Parks as a Costume Fabrication Specialist, making costumes, doing repairs and alterations.

3. Provide Mobile Wardrobe Services, this can include sewing and other related services like laundry, steaming, ironing, dressing assistance and more. I’ve been doing this since 2011 for an event production company that staffs the local crew at arena shows. I’ve worked for over 50 touring celebrities and dozens of Broadway shows.

4. Design and Sew your own ideas and use sites like Etsy or Shopify to sell them online. I have a friend (above Alienphant) who makes a living renting booth space at Cosplay Conventions selling her fun fashions. You can also partner with local boutique to consign your work or do trunk shows.

5. Create a collection for a runway show. Once you have about 10 looks, you can use your prototypes for a photo shoot, runway show and even continue on into production. Above is CJ Golden of Starboy Swimwear. You can sell your designs right off the runway or take custom orders.

6. Teach Sewing. I teach sewing to all ages with in home private lessons and hold group sewing classes at local community centers.

7. Do Commissioned Replica Work, I’ve made several reproductions of film, characters, rock start tribute band costumes and Fashion.

What creative ways have you used your sewing skills to make money?

Gina Vincenza Van Epps

AKA Psycho Seamstress

Founder of Orlando Fashion District

Mobile Wardrobe Services

Costume Rigging Illustrated

House Of Vincenza

Orlando, FloridaGina@PsychoSeamstress.com

Garment Designers Pre Production Checklist

For the last several years I have been balancing my time between fashion and costuming for companies including Disney and Universal Theme Parks.

Since 2011, I have worked with over 50 celebrity clients like Beyonce and was featured in her Formation World Tour Behind The Scenes Fashion video.
I've worked on costumes for Justin Bieber's Believe Film, Taylor Swift's Red Tour, Rihanna's Diamonds and Anti World Tours and many, many more.
Last year I even restored Janis Joplin's Cape for the Hard Rock International, which is now on display in San Francisco, CA. You can read all about these adventures in my other blog posts.

I now have my own design and production house, where I specialize in pre production work, wholesale fabric sourcing and managing domestic and international production runs on all kinds of garments, shoes, bags and even tactical and combat training gear through House Of Vincenza.

As the Founder and President of Orlando Fashion District we've taken on the mission to make Orlando a Fashion Destination and to support and encourage fashion designers everywhere.

Designers hire to help them take their designs from concept to creation and into production, many of them aren't exactly sure how the process works.

To help you understand how this process works, I created this checklist of things you need to start working on, if you have designs you'd like to reproduce.

  1. Solid Concept – this can come in the form of sketches, photos or even an existing garment you'd like to use as inspiration for your designs. The more detailed the better. Refining these details in the process will cost more money than having them figured out in advance.
  2. Pattern – this has to be created in order to build a prototype of your design. It will be the foundation of everything and may need to be altered several times to get it perfect.
  3. Fabrics – using the fabrics you'd like to go into production with, is the best way to build your prototypes. If you don't have them sorted out, custom printed and sourced in sample quantities prior to moving forward, it could delay the process. Changing fabrics later means making another prototype. Skipping this step can be an expensive mistake if the production fabrics don't behave, look or feel the same way as your prototype fabrics. If you "can't afford" to make a new prototype, then you need to rework your funding.
  4. Notions – zippers, buttons, snaps, elastics, threads and any other materials you'll be using for your design needs to be sourced up front in sample quantities. These items will all need to be tested as part of your prototype. Changing this later means another prototype will need to be made in order to avoid production problems cause by these last minute changes that won't work right in your design.
  5. Labels – start working on your clothing label designs at the same time as your prototypes or it could delay production. These can take a few weeks to get these the way you'd like.
  6. Prototypes – this will be the first reality test of your designs. Don't expect it to be perfect the first time. This process can take several revisions. Be prepared for that. Emotionally and Financially. It might seem like a long and expensive process, but if you fail to test everything here and now and then move forward into production it could cost you a lot more time and money to go back and correct something after you've had hundreds of them made wrong or in a way that doesn't fit or work properly.
  7. Tech Pack – Once you've got a solid design prototype you can move on to the next step, which is creating all of the technical specifications of your garment. This is commonly referred to as a "tech pack" in the industry. Moving forward into production without this, especially with a new provider can leave a lot of things open to their interpretation. Not a good plan. Technical specs will clearly define and communicate to the production house, how your garment should be assembled, what types of seams go where, what kind and colors of thread, how to install your elastic, notions and so on are all explained in this document. Look at it as the assembly instruction that go along with your pattern and parts. What you get without it is an expensive crap shoot.
  8. Digitizing – This is the process of converting your paper patterns into an auto cad program like Gerber. If you've got access to someone who uses this or a similar program in the beginning stages it can save time and money down the road. It can be used to create your grading instead of having it done by hand. You can also use it to creat your "pattern markers" or "cut sheets" which I will talk about more in my next post.
  9. Grading – This is the process of creating all of the sizes for each design. It can be small, medium and large or numbered sizes. There are ASTM.org industry standards that can help determine these guidelines based on algorithms of global sizing standards. (There's also a thing called "vanity" sizing. A lot of brands run big so that you will fit into a smaller size and hopefully buy it because we all wish we were a size smaller. Ugh. It's a thing.) Making a sample of each size before you go into production with it is an important part of proper grading. Having an ASTM dimensioned fit model for each size will help make your sizing fit average size buyers.
  10. Production – Deciding on a production house is the next step. I will talk more about this in my next posts. Domestic production in the USA vs International Production is a complicated decision. Staying in the USA is possible for most items, but expensive compared to international options. Why? Mainly because the minimum wage in the USA is several times higher than other countries. There are also fabric issues to consider. Going international means it will be more cost effective to use fabrics the factory has either readily available or choosing from what they can source for you. Getting fabric samples from your production house in advance can streamline the pre production process.

Some of the other things you can do with all of these prototypes is enter runway shows, do photo shoots, trunk shows and start working on pre marketing your designs.

My next post will be about going into the production process. I'll write about it from a USA domestic perspective and from an international perspective.

Good Talk!

Got any questions?
Did I leave anything out? Gina@HouseOfVincenza.com

Stay Tuned.

Restoring Janis Joplin’s Cape…

Last fall I was commissioned by the Hard Rock Cafe to restore Janis Joplin’s Cape, which is now on display in San Francisco, California. 

Here are the before and after photos from that restoration. 


I am available to consult on the alteration, repair or restoration of Historical, High End Couture and Memoribilia clothing worldwide.