How to get your own fabric designs professionally printed by the yard!

How to get your own fabric designs professionally printed by the yard!

A few years ago I was wondering how to get custom fabrics made for clients who were asking for a one of a kind design.

Well I’ve since found and used 2 different ways to do this, even if you only need 1 yard of fabric!

The first way is a little more hands on and the quality is good, but you’ll need to have some basic design skills. You should be able to figure out this DIY method online through a website called Spoonflower.

There are some other websites out there, but this one, I have actually used myself to print a fabric out of my Psycho Seamstress logo, which I cut out and use as labels to sew onto clothing I’ve made. You can design fabrics for yourself or to sell to others for a commission using this site.

Here’s the link to my Psycho Seamstress logo design:
http://www.spoonflower.com/designs/2316838-psycho-seamstress-skull-scissors-half-brick-by-psychoseamstress
Feel free to buy some!! LOL

Not only can Spoonflower print your designs on several types of fabric, but you can also use the images to create wallpaper, wrapping paper or stickers! It was super easy and super cool!

The second way is easier if you know what you want, but don’t exactly have the graphic design skills to make it happen. It’s a little more expensive than the DIY method, but the results are stunning and very high end.

I use a company called Solid Stone Fabrics. This company has several dozen gorgeous fabrics to choose from including spandex, swimwear fabrics, silk chiffons, organza, duck, jersey, neoprene, fabrics with sequins, foiled color, metallics, even carpet!! If you contact them, they can ship you out a swatch ring of some amazing high end fabrics you’ll have to choose from. Ask for Luke Harris, he’s one of the owners and the main sales guy. Tell him I sent you!

Here’s a link to their website:
http://www.solidstonefabrics.com

Solid Stone will assign a graphic designer to your project and THEY will create a graphic design file to your specifications, for a reasonable set up fee.
Once your design is initially approved by you in an email, they will send you a sample of the design printed on the fabric of your choice. Once you approve the sample, you can order it as needed with a one yard minimum.

Using custom designed fabrics is a great way to raise your price tag. You can create a much more unique and cohesive fashion collection by using the same pattern or design on multiple items in different fabrics. Finding coordinating designs and fabrics on the open market can be a challenge. When you design your own fabrics, you can create matching stretch jeans, silky tops, make sheer cover ups paired with swimwear and more, just like all of the high end brands do and order your fabrics as needed.

If you’d like more insider tips on how to excel as a fashion designer, join my group on Facebook called “Clothing Designer Resources” and feel free to share your best connections, collections and advice!!

You can contact me at Gina@PsychoSeamstress.com

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10 Questions to Ask When Shopping for a Production Facility for Fashion

For the last few years, I have been consulting with clients who are just beginning in fashion. They usually come to me with a pile of sketches or inspiration photos of garments they want to create and have no idea what journey they are about to embark upon to get from these humble beginnings to a finished product, ready to sell. The process can literally take months. (here is an outline of THAT process… How to Start a Fashion Line Realistically and Ethically)  Although there are many steps that have to be complete before you can go into production, here are the steps to take once the design and prototype process has been completed. Doing this yourself is a big job, but here are some basic questions to ask when shopping for a factory to produce your clothing:

1. Are they a fair wage factory?

Chances are, if it’s in a foreign country they aren’t and won’t answer honestly. Nowadays people are asking more and more questions about where and how it’s made and are judging your line accordingly. People ARE willing to pay more to ensure they aren’t endorsing slavery. (Click this link to find out how many slaves work for you) ETHICAL production is available at an affordable price CAN be found if you contact Organizations like Fashion Hope. They can will assist you worldwide, in finding a production facility that doesn’t involve human trafficking, slavery, forced or child labor. Tell them I sent you or contact me for help with this.

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2. Where are they located?

This factor is important for a number of reasons:
– Get shipping estimates to and from the factory, those expenses should be considered as part of your production cost in both directions.
– You will need to ship them patterns, prototypes and materials and they will be shipping you material samples, garment samples and finished products. – — Import fees should also be considered, estimated and added to your bottom line.

3. Can you affordably visit their facility?

I highly recommend you do so. Having a face to face with your factory and touring the facility is an important part of making a smart investment decision and maintaining a profitable relationship. Go with your gut. If anything seems sketchy it’s better to keep looking and write off the trip expenses than to invest thousands of dollars in a production house that doesn’t have their act together, too much could go wrong.

4. Do they have all the right sewing machines to make your garments?

If they have a website make sure they are currently making similar items. It’s unreasonable to expect one factory to sew your entire collection if you’ve got jeans, dresses, t shirts and swimwear. Each of those items uses different sewing machines and fabrics to construct. It’s better to find a factory that specializes in one type of garment for each item in your collection if they differ greatly in how they need to be constructed.

5. Can they send you samples of their work on similar garments?

Ask them to mail (even if you have to pay for them) you similar items and check the quality of their work inside and out.
– Look for dropped stitches or stitch defects that mean their equipment needs to be better maintained or that quality control might be an issue.

Here’s an example of what a stitch defect looks like… it can eventually unravel and cause problems with the construction of your garment, making it open up at the seam.


– Check to make sure the fabric is cut properly and on the grain and is perfectly straight up and down where it needs to be in the garment. If anything is cut crooked it will not drape properly and when you wash it, it will get “wonky”. Here is an example of a cuff that was either cut off the grainline or sewn in a bit crooked. When you wash this item it will go sideways and then not drape properly.

Off Grain Banding

This is an example of the bottom band of a sweatshirt that was either cut off the grain of the knit or was sewn in crooked. See how the knit of the Grey Knit is not straight up and down to the Yellow Knit.

Wash the item(s) if you can to see how it holds up. If they aren’t cutting the pattern out properly it can ruin an entire production run.
I have a friend who had a 3 piece outfit made in China. They cut one piece wrong and it couldn’t be salvaged. The whole outfit had to be scratched for that season even though the other two pieces were fine.   That was about a $5k loss.

6. Can they provide fabric and notions sourced locally or do they have adequate storage for you to send them the fabrics and notions you’ve sourced for production?

Get samples of what they have access to before you have anything made in their fabrics. Get swatches and samples of their fabrics, notions, buttons, garment tags, even elastics.
Send them reference photos or swatches and samples of what fabrics and notions that you want to use and see what they come up with locally. I know one designer who had everything specified to the China factory on her swimwear collection and even sent them a sample of swimwear elastic. When they constructed her swimwear they substituted her swimwear elastic with what was essentially a “rubber band” type of elastic. It caused a fit issue with her collection and was a cheap and substandard elastic. She didn’t even know it had happened until her pattern maker took apart on of her factory made swimsuits on a redesign.

7. How much do they charge for a factory sample?

This price can vary depending on the complexity of the garment.
If it’s a pretty basic pattern block that is common in fashion then it could be $20 or less.
If it’s an original design they should be able to give you a ballpark estimate from a photo or drawing and description by email.
The average price that I’ve found for a factory sample seems to be right around $80. Standard Proceedure is to send them a pattern and prototype and they will send you a factory made garment.

8. What is their average turn around time on an order?

Planning ahead and allowing for all of the standard turn around time is a huge factor if you have seasonal items.

9. What other services do they offer?

Do you need anything else done to your garment that could be done at the factory? This can include screen printing, custom garment tags (vs the cheap plastic looking ones that scream low budget production!!) distressing, adding riveted buttons, zippers and so on can frequently be outsourced locally by the factory.

10. What is their policy on orders that are made wrong or what happens if you don’t get what you reasonably expected?

If you’re saying to your self, “damn, this seems a lot more complicated, expensive and time consuming, than I thought!” You’re right. It is a long and drawn out process, but it can be done. Contact me and I can help you through the process. Managing this yourself, as I said earlier is a big job and can result in huge losses if you don’t ask all the right questions or skip a step in an attempt to get your items made quickly.

Join my Clothing Designer Resources Group on Facebook for more information on how to go to market with your designs.  Continue reading

How To Start A Fashion Line… Realistically and ETHICALLY!

A few times a week I get calls and emails from people who want me to help them create a fashion garment or clothing line. Many of them admittedly know nothing about what it actually takes to make that happen…

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If you think you can call up a pattern maker or seamstress and have them create a garment you can turn around and sell for $25 with a profit in it for you, let me nicely advise  “you’re trippin!”

25 dress

Sorry to burst your bubble, but allow me to enlighten you…

  1. for retail prices like that, it would require a factory production order of about 1,000 + pieces
  2. a retail line of stores willing to place large orders of your designs or other successful mass market distribution plan already in place
  3. an INITIAL investment of about $25,000 to cover patterns, prototypes, factory samples, 100 yard rolls of fabric, notions, thread, labor, labels, cargo shipping to the USA, customs fees, import taxes, shipping get it from the port to a distribution center, then shipping to get it to the retailer
  4. AND your items will probably be made in unethical, human trafficking and/or child labor conditions for a $5 profit per garment. Let’s just hope you don’t have to put it on sale!!

Soooooo, unless you’ve got that kind of cash laying around, don’t quit your day job AND let’s hope “they” cut, sew and assemble everything correctly or it could be a total loss (I’ve seen it happen with a friends’ fashion line!!)

money-blackhole

In order for me to help you understand what it takes to realistically bring your concepts to creation, Here is a step by step outline of the process for taking a garment into factory production and the reasonable expenses involved.

First of all you’ve got to have a general idea of what you want to create, one garment at a time. Even if you start with one design, define the details with photos or rough sketches. I meet with a lot of clients who start with a collage of photos we combine their favorite elements of each into the one garment they want to create. ie this neckline, that sleeve, this front, that back, etc. (For the record, you can not simply knock off someone else’s garment with the exact same fabrics, notions and details or you could get sued. You have to change the original garment by design, fabric, notions and/or stitching details by at least 25%!!!)

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Now make a list of all the features you want your garment to have such as seam finishes, pockets, top stitching details, hem finishes, fabrics, zippers, buttons, notions, etc. Take photos of details you want from your own clothing or a stores clothing line for reference.

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Second thing you need to do is create a fashion illustration or “flat” taking all of the inspiration photos and combine them into a functional image of what you want your end product to look like. This step isn’t absolutely necessary, but it will help the pattern maker get all of the details right the first time. A good fashion illustrator will charge about $50-100 per hour to draw everything in detail.

Fashion_Illustration

Next, you will need to have a pattern made. This averages about $150 and up, per garment. Pattern making is an art that requires precise knowledge of fit, body curves and other techniques. Sometimes you can use a store bought home sewing pattern as a base and alter it to your specification. This can still take a few hours to do.

pattern making

“Grading” the pattern into different sizes, comes later and will be an additional expense. Grading by hand usually starts at $50 per each additional size depending upon the number of pattern pieces, but it can go much higher. I recommend, if you’re serious about launching a fashion line, you find a pattern maker who knows how to use Gerber, which is an autocad program for fashion. There are expenses involved in translating your paper patterns into the autocad system, (from $25 per design and up) but it will greatly reduce the turn around time and expense to grade ($15 per size vs $50+ by hand), alter and transmit your designs to the factory in the long run. Add these figures in your budget if your item is not one size fits all.

Graded pattern

Choosing fabrics for your prototype can be done a number of ways. Many times we create the prototype out of muslin, canvas, duck, spandex or other cheap fabric that behaves similar to the final fabric, mainly so the fit can be defined without cutting into more expensive final fabric. Prototypes usually start at $150 each or up to $50 an hour or more, to cut and sew. If someone charges less make sure they have the skills to do all of these things.

hire a pro

To give you an example of a real life situation and it’s numbers, I had a client with 14 items in her collection. Between pattern making and 3 phases of prototypes it costed about $7000.00 in labor. This did not include materials, which ranged from $25-180 PER YARD. Her fabrics were very delicate, high end and her garments had couture details.

couture-pattern-muslin

Sourcing of final fabrics and notions is an important part of creating a fashion line. There are many factors to consider. There are a series of fabric show around the country by DG Expo which are free to attend and invaluable to finding everything you need to create a successful clothing line.

  1. How many of each item do you intend on making at a time? 25/50/100 (this is called a run)
  2. How many yards will you need for each item? Sometimes as a designer it can be difficult to get a response from a wholesale factory or mill on fabrics and pricing, because they would rather deal directly with a design or production house because they see them as a more profitable client. I’ve had that happen to several clients.
  3. What kind of fabric do you want to use? Woven, Knit, Natural Fiber, Synthetic, Denim, Stretch, Etc…
  4. Will your garment simply be wash and wear or will it require hand washing or dry cleaning? This will be important to your decision. (Wash, wear and tear testing will need be done once you’ve gotten past the prototype phase and have a sample in the desired fabrics for production.)
  5. How will it play with the other fabrics involved? ie, will one shrink more than another, will it bleed, fade, need interfacing, lining, etc… (this again needs to be part of the research and development of your garments)
  6. Find out if you can get a few yards of sample Fabric to use for a sample garments.
  7. Fabric for production is usually ordered by the bolt or roll to ensure consistency in production and to get the best price. Find out what their minimums are. Some companies have a minimum roll price of so many yards. This can range from 25+ yards and up for example. Otherwise you will pay twice as much (usually retail) for anything less that their minimum quantity.

ROLLS OF FABRIC LINE THE WALL_0

What kind of trims will it need? Lace, Bias Tape, Piping, etc, those will need to be sourced and purchased in volume.

SOURCING

What kind of zippers, buttons, snaps, hooks do you want to use for closures? Will they need to be custom made with your logo on them? All this will need to be budgeted, sourced and purchased for production.

Labels

What kind of labels are required by law?
You could have your entire run rejected if it is not labeled properly. Many garments are required to be labeled with the fiber contents of the fabrics, where the item was made and any safety related information.
You should have one label with care instructions and one that has your logo, brand, size of the garment and can also contain its inventory item number, web address, etc. These can be one in the same, screen printed onto the fabric or made to order tags that have been printed, woven, embroidered and could be made of fabric or other synthetic materials.

Choosing a production facility.

  1. First thing you will want to do is research what type of garments each factory is set up to run.
    For example, some factories specialize in certain types of garments or fabrics. Find a few that might work.
  2. Have each factory make you a sample of how they would produce your item. This is called a factory sample. In order to do this, they will need a combination of the following items.
    1. A prototype or sample of the item you wish to reproduce
    2. Patterns for the size you want them to make
    3. A “tech pack” or spread sheet of information and illustrations regarding every precise measurements and construction details of your garment.
    4. Samples of all of the materials required to produce your garment or specifications on what materials you’d like them to use for their sample.

Here are some samples of what those documents look like. You will need to hire a professional to put these together in most cases.

tech tech2 tech3

It can take several weeks to turn around a factory sample and can cost a anywhere from $100-1000 to get everything together for the factory.

Another thing to consider is any language barrier. If you can’t communicate easily and frequently with this factory by email or they take days to respond to a simple request that should be taken into consideration as a red flag.

If you choose this factory you should also be prepared to fly to this county to visit the factory, meet with its staff and inspect it for yourself. If your planing on investing several thousand dollars, the expense is worth it.

Another thing to consider is to hire a liaison from that area to go to the factory unannounced to check on the quality and progress of your run. I had a friend who did all of the above and still lost several thousand dollars due to quality issues and unapproved fabric swapping that cost her about $10k in losses. She ordered a three piece outfit, which became unusable because they messed up one piece in production on the entire run.

Sound overwhelming? There is a lot involved in taking a fashion line into production. If you don’t want all these headaches it is best to hire someone to manage your project who has a background in overseas fashion production.

What’s the alternative? Get real! Unless you are Walmart, you need to return to earth and start on a smaller scale. Here are a few ideas that have worked for some of my clients. In order to make money, you need to have a realistic price point that includes a reasonable cost for materials and labor.

Here’s how to figure that out:

  1. How much can you reasonably get all the materials you will need to make your item? This will be your Materials Cost
  2. Getting your pattern and prototype made will run about $150 for the pattern and $150 for the prototype AND UP if your garment is complicated. This is part of your Research & Development Cost and a critical part of the process, if this is not done correctly it will be down hill from here.
  3. Once the first pattern and prototype (usually in a muslin or other cheap fabric that behaves similar to the fabrics you’d like to use in your final garment) have been made you should have an estimate on how long it will take to cut and sew your garment and an initial sample of what you’d like to make.
  4. Now is the time to review your design, fit it to your “fit model” and proceed in refining your design as many times as necessary, to meet with your final approval.
  5. Once you’ve got everything perfectly the way you want it, the next step is to create a designer sample in your final, more expensive fabrics. Whoever is sewing your samples, should be able to provide a retail quality skill level (no sewing mistakes) AND have the right equipment (which can be very expensive). This is important because your samples could eventually end up being photographed, used for marketing, fashion shows and even sold to clients directly.
  6. Take your sample garment, hire a model and a photographer (or just do it yourself!) and create some professional looking images of your garment. You can post these images to Facebook, Twitter, Etsy, Instagram, Pintrest and other social media sites and ask people if they would buy this item. You can even start taking orders with a realistic turn around time (4-6 weeks on Etsy). You can also set up trunk shows at local boutiques and shop it around to some retailer to see if they’d be interested in placing an order.
  7. After you have test marketed you item you can start to prepare to produce them as needed using a local seamstress or short run production house at a fair wage, which in the US, is going to run about $10+ for a skilled seamstress with good equipment.
  8. You can launch an entire collection this way by starting small.

Once you have some orders flowing in, have created a following and your local seamstress or short run production house becomes too busy to handle your orders, here is a great way to get factory quality and quantity at a fair and ethical price…

Fashion Hope

Fashion Hope is an international organization, founded by a friend of mine, Marc Palmer.
Marc can:

  1. Introduce you to funding sources and their audience, which could help you FUND your fashion line ethically with certified fair wage production, worldwide
  2. Assist you in creating a documentary of your fashion story and mission for reasonable fees contact info@fashionhope.org regarding the cost.
  3. Assist Designers with a strong media following and other outside funding to coordinate a trip to a country where they have rescued women from unethical, human trafficking situations and converted them into a fair wage working environments
  4. Through Fashion Hope, you will get to work hands on with their fashion production experts to ensure your project is in good hands and experience the people and community where your garments will be produced
  5. You can join the growing list of ethical designers and promote your line as being both fair wage and ethical in its production practices, which are huge selling points
  6. Be Introduced to the coordinators of annual fashion week events any where in the world, get discounts or FREE benefits once you have an established Brand
  7. Become part of the “IN CROWD” who can give a confidant answer about where and how your garments are being made

To learn more about Fashion Hope and become a part of the growing movement to produce Fashion ethically, you can find Marc Palmer’s Fashion Hope page at Fashion Hope on Facebook or email Marc@FashionHope.org

For more on the issues of human trafficking and to find out how many slaves you own, check out…http://mtvexit.org/ and http://slaveryfootprint.org/survey/

I am on a mission to create an Orlando Fashion District, if you would like to become part of this movement, please like my Facebook Page for all of the latest info and share your local favorites!!

Thanks for tuning in!

Follow me on Facebook at Psycho Seamstress for all the latest!

Check out some of my fashion client and film work at House of Vincenza

Gina Vincenza Van Epps is aka Psycho Seamstress

A List Wardrobe Seamstress, Designer and Costume Fabrication Specialist, Key Wardrobe

Gina@PsychoSeamstress.com

Justin Bieber Costume Sewing “Challenge Accepted”

Funny how life works out sometimes. When one door closes and another door opens. This show was actually the catalyst that launched my year long journey into following MY dreams.

I had just been hired by a very up and coming software company and was really looking forward to getting back into the high tech industry. Turns out life had a better plan for me.
As I was sitting in my tiny cubicle trying to work through the horrid training day, I missed a call from the event production company I worked wardrobe for. As it turns out the software training class of 30 was dwindling, as they were weeding people out. I wasn’t fully expecting to get cut that day, but when I did I was really disappointed. As I was heading out of the building a bit bummed, my phone rang again with a call that changed my year.

I was asked to work as a seamstress for Justin Bieber and get back to her with any other stitchers who could sew a big job the show requested. I made a few calls and rounded up a crew of 3 plus me.

My sewing friends Kyle Vest (of Skin Wars Fame), Karen, Steve Walden and I arrived at the arena with sewing machines in tow on January 25th, we were escorted back to a room beyond the normal wardrobe area. It was there, we learned we were 4 of 7, who would be upcycling 17 sets of navy sweatsuits to piece in some blue faux leather for Justin’s dancers to wear in tomorrow’s filming of “Boyfriend” for his 3D Believe Concert Tour Movie being shot in Miami.

Wow.

Ok.

So as we are setting up our machines his regular wardrobe crew was cutting out the materials we would use and trying to formulate a plan. The hoodie sweatshirts had baseball shirt style sleeves, which had to be removed, cut off above the elbow and replaced with faux leather, then also replace the front pocket, the lower part of the pants below the knee and some other alterations.

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We decided to set things up like a production line with each person doing a part of the project. Steve and I, took on the most difficult part of the project, which was replacing the upper part of the sleeves. Steve is an old school Seamster, who has spend most of his career in theater, he’s super smart when it comes to design engineering. We whipped up the first one and took it over to the head of wardrobe for inspection. After the upcycled top was approved Kyle, Karen, Steve and I had 16 more to go while the other team of 3 worked on the pants.

About midway thru the day, we were interrupted by a sweet talkative little bald girl, who was obviously a cancer patient. She informed us this was not the first time she has met Justin Bieber! It was nice to know he takes the time out to make wishes come true for kids like her.
8 hours later we were done ahead of schedule and the costumes premiered that night in Orlando.

Bieber Costumes
It was then that I decided not to look for another day job and figure out a way to do what I love to do, full time. It worked!

Since I could loose my job for taking photos back stage I had to surf the net for a few weeks waiting for photos to surface from the movie shoot. I finally found a few.
In August, I got to work for JB a second time during his Tampa show. This time in wardrobe and quick change with the same touring wardrobe crew.

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There are about 25 dancers and crew inside the stage that make the whole show go like a well oiled machine. It was amazing to see such synchronized teamwork. It was the most impressive quick change and behind the scenes assignment I’ve had to date.
The movie came out this week. I can’t wait to see it! Who wants to go?

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How I got into Marilyn Manson’s Pants…

This is a story about calling your shot, being prepared and what amazing opportunities come.

Thursday, June 18th Marilyn Manson was performing at the Hard Rock Live venue in Orlando, FL. Todd, a friend of mine is his Production Manager. He graciously provided me and my friend  with tickets and backstage passes.

Being the mobile A List Wardrobe Seamstress that I am, I let Todd know that I would be bringing my sewing machine, just in case he had anything that need to be altered or repaired. He, at the time, did not have anything, but I decided to bring my stuff anyway. Always Be Prepared!!

As the opening band took the stage, I received a text from Todd saying they had sent some of Marilyn’s stagewear out to be repaired and the local seamstress REALLY messed up the job and he would like me to take a look at it after the show to see if it could be salvaged. I agreed.

During Marilyn’s amazing performance he had a costume change for each song. WOW, that was pretty bad ass and not typical these days in the rock music world. At one point he came out on stage wearing the “DRUGS” Tie, my friend and collaborator on a few projects, Kim “Kylla” Dylla (check her out Kylla Custom Rock Wear, she’s the bomb and aka Vulvatron of GWAR!) had just given him a few days earlier. Most of the stuff I deal with are tours with pop artists and a lot of dancers. I was impressed. He even did a song on stilts. Very cool!

As the show winded down, we met up with Ken,  another friend and client of mine who used to tour with the likes of KISS, Alice Cooper and Stone Temple Pilots among others. Ken had tour credentials and escorted us past the fan and groupie line and down into catering to wait for Todd.

Quite the freak show down there, I must say!! I was under dressed, which doesn’t happen often, shoulda wore my latex and goth boots!!! We tried some of Marilyn’s own Absinthe “MANSINTHE” which we learned he ingests from dawn till dusk. It was pretty interesting. I didn’t want to drink too much of it though, as I still had work to do!!

After chilling with the freaks, we were escorted into the Tour Manager’s office where I was handed a pair of the nicest stretch leather pants I’ve ever seen. They were sent out to have a hole repaired and they came back with a raggedy half assed patch and the highly recommended seamstress, took it upon herself to TAPER THE LEGS of his LEATHER SKINNY JEANS! OMG!! Who does that?? (As soon as I verify her identity, I will post it!! Can you say BLACK BALLED?) When Brian went to put them on for the show, he got stuck in the legs! Wardrobe had to scramble around to find another pair of pants for him to wear STAT! (Sounds like some Bible banger’s sabotage attempt to me!)

I turned them inside out and was relieved to find she had not trimmed the seam and that they could be let out to the original seam. I handed the pants to my friend and asked her to pick all the stitches out with a seam ripper I just happened to have in my pocket. (Don’t tell security, THOSE SLACKERS!!)

As she went to work on the pants, a runner took me out to retrieve my car and mobile sewing gear.  After a fiasco with the back lot at Universal, I finally got through and parked my car next to the tour bus, grabbed my gear and swam past the crew loading out the show.

By the time I returned, my friend had the FUBAR seam opened up, I repaired the hole the conspirator botched and ran his pants through my sewing machine to restore them to their original state.  DAY SAVED!

NOW, Where did that bottle of Mansinthe go?

#marilynmanson, #ginavincenzavanepps, #psychoseamstress, #fashionincubator, #savedtheday, #wereallstarsnow, #howiroll, #stagewear, #mansonspants, #blackballedseamstress, #igotthis, #hardrockliveorlando, @marilynmanson, #dopeshow, #mansinthe, @psychoseamstres

 mansons pants